Discussione:
"HOLLYWOOD GARBAGE AND HOW TO SMELL IT"
(troppo vecchio per rispondere)
AP
2005-03-21 06:20:04 UTC
Permalink
from othercinema.com;

"HOLLYWOOD GARBAGE AND HOW TO SMELL IT"

by DENNIS NYBACK

The continuing waste of Newspaper space in the Arts and Entertainment
pages on Hollywood movies mystifies and appalls me. Please be advised
that I use the term Hollywood very loosely and intend it to cover 90%
of current films. For roughly twenty years, the films being churned
out have had nothing to do with art and everything to do with money.
If these films should be reported on at all it should be in the
financial section. The Arts & Entertainment pages should report on
just that: films that qualify.

How is that we've arrived at this desperate place? In the late
Seventies, the big motion picture producers hit on a formula for
money-making movies and have stuck to it. The big secret of the
formula is the concept of structured mediocrity. Don't strive for
greatness, play it safe. Don't challenge the audience, feed them
pabulum. Filmmaker John Woo recently said "Movies today lack heart and
tears. Studios don't want to take the risk".

In contrast, Robert Browning once said "A man's reach should exceed
his grasp". That statement is the antithesis of Hollywood today. They
realize that art is not created by playing it safe but instead of
reaching further, they grasp the easily attainable. Over and over and
over. The critics have apparently failed to notice this and continue
to take part in this colossal fraud by writing about the same old
shit.

The steady growth of the pure Garbage spewed out every year results in
a massive waste of newspaper ink and pulp. The modern market of
exponenentially increasing multiplexes, short theatrical runs,
unlimited TV channels, and video outlets, effectively monopolizes the
limited available newspaper space. As a result, films made by people
whose vision goes beyond profit are lost in the flood of celluloid
sewage with its mega ad camapigns. This tacit conspiracy between film
producers and newspapers almost guarantees that films made for profit
will succeed and films made for art will fail.

The first part of the formula for box-office success that I mentioned
earlier is an overriding philosophy. The most important thing is to
strive for mediocrity. The mediocre film doesn't need to generate huge
box office in the theatres. It may take a while but product placement
alone offsets much of the cost. After the US theatrical run comes the
Overseas markets, TV, and Video. The only way to screw this up is to
try and make a better film. A film that challenges an audience, that
is thought-provoking and something more than chewing gum for the eyes
is the only one that can fail.

The second part of the standard formula emphasizes style over
substance and includes the followng dictates:

* Start with a concept, not a script, writing is not important.

* Never depend on the vision of one writer but get a committee so
that one writer can spot the mistakes the others are making.

* Get a star, acting is not important.

* Get a bombastic composer. The composer is more important than
the writer. Good writing is rare and difficult. So, why bother doing
that when you can stir the emotions with loud music. (In certain films
aimed at the baby-boom generation, a composer is not even neded; a
disc-jockey is. Select the right blend of golden oldies a la Quentin
Tarentino and you're home free!)

* Get some special effects, again volume not content is important.

* Most importantly, tack on a happy ending. Voila! It goes down
easy and has no side effects such as being remembered a week later
when the same thing is dressed up and trotted out again.

I say that this has now been going on for twenty years based on a
conversation reported in the New York Times several years ago. The
reporter followed a maverick Hollywood producer around for awhile and
wrote about him. At one point he is having lunch with a mainstream
producers and says to him "Remember how great some of those films were
back in the Seventies when they would actually have unhappy endings?
Films like MEAN STREETS and THE PARALLAX VIEW and MCCABE AND MRS.
MILLER?" The mainstream guy just looked at him like he was an idiot
and said "Oh, that. That all ended with ROCKY!".

The producers have realized this but the critics still haven't caught
on. Many critics are now simply "Quote Whores". They will try to
include one catchy line in every review they write in the hope that it
will be used and credited to them in the advertisements. As long as
they get their name in the ads, their career is a success. No matter
how lousy a film is, it can always find a half dozen critics who will
say it's great in some quotable way. In today's New York Times, Siskel
and Ebert give "two thumbs up" to seven crummy movies. They also trot
out the tried and true "A great date film" for an eighth. Paul Wunder
is quoted as saying THE LOST WORLD is "The entertainment event of the
decade". Maria Sales says CONAIR is "The Roller-coaster ride of your
life". Joel Siegal says SPEED 2 is "A great summer film". Janet Maslin
says BREAKDOWN "Packs a punch". It goes on and on. Silly
overstatement, mindless hyperbole, trite cliches and out and out lies.

To help people to just say no to Hollywood Garbage, I offer the
following ten suggestions:

1. Never go to a film because it is "The Number One Film In
America"

2. Never go to a film that used more than two script writers or is
based on a best selling novel.

3. Never go to a film that advertises its soundtrack on sale.
Especially if it lists several artists as being featured on the
soundtrack.

4. Never go to a film because you saw it advertised on Television
or because the trailer had a hilarious line. Trailers were once used
to hint at what you would see. They didn't want to give anything away
free but make you shell out money to watch. Today they use the best
scenes and funniest lines to sucker you into believing that there's
plenty more where that came from.

5. Never go to a film that features product tie-ins with any
multi-national burger chain.

6. Never go to a film that runs an advertisemet with guns pointing
at your or that has a number after its title.

7. Never go to a film if it's based on a true story and you're
expecting the truth.

8. Never go to a film based on a TV show that baby-boomers
remember.

9. Never go to a film that is so bad that even Siskel and Ebert
don't like it and the producers have to resort to some quote whore
you've never heard of from an equally obscure publication.

10. Never go to a film with Quentin Tarentino, Oliver Stone, or
anyone else that you care to add to this list.
--
www.iaciners.org
<<See, now's the time of the meal when you start getting the McStomach
ache.>>
Nicola de Angeli
2005-03-21 08:12:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by AP
Please be advised
that I use the term Hollywood very loosely and intend it to cover 90%
of current films.
Eccone un altro che inviterei ad una cena fra amici.


Ciao
Nicola

skype: deca64

--

"Striving for mediocrity in a world of excellence."
un fake di Alberto
2005-03-21 14:41:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by AP
from othercinema.com;
"HOLLYWOOD GARBAGE AND HOW TO SMELL IT"
by DENNIS NYBACK
Dire cose fondamentalmente giuste in modo cosi' sciocco come costui mi
pare controproducente.

(Glielo scrivi tu che Siskel e' morto da qualche anno?)
--
UFV:La fiera della vanità/Confortorio(VHS)/Placido Rizzotto(VHS)/Una
lunga domenica di passioni/L'ange(VHS)/C'eravamo tanto amati(VHS)
Steamboat Bill, Jr.(DVD) - http://www.albertofarina.tk
Gwilbor
2005-03-21 17:04:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by AP
10. Never go to a film with Quentin Tarentino, Oliver Stone, or
anyone else that you care to add to this list.
D'accordo su tutto, ma proprio questi due doveva prednere a esempio?
--
Gwilbor
gwilbor(at)email.it
"Strano gioco. L'unica mossa vincente è non giocare"
AP
2005-03-22 21:30:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by AP
from othercinema.com;
"HOLLYWOOD GARBAGE AND HOW TO SMELL IT"
by DENNIS NYBACK
lo spreco continuo di spazio sui giornali nella pagine delle arti e
ricreazione sui film di Hollywood mi confonde e spaventa.
Notate per favore che uso il termine hollywood in senso largo e che
riguarda il 90% dei film che sono al momento presenti nelle sale.
Per circa 20 anni i film tirati fuori da hollywood non hanno nulla a che
vedere con con le arti e molto a che vedere con i soldi.
se questi film devono trovare spazio sui giornali, questo dovrebbe essere
la pagina della finanza, non quella delle arti.

Come siamo arrivati a questo punto? nei tardi anni 70 i grandi produttori
di film hanno trovato la formula per film che erano macchine per far soldi
e sono rimasti aderenti a quella. il grosso segreto di quella formula e' il
concetto di farli appositamente mediocri. Non lottare per la grandezza,
tienti basso. Non sfidare il pubblico, dagli la pappa pronta. Il regista
John Wood ha detto di recente "I film di oggi mancano di cuore e lacrime,
gli Sudios non vogliono correre rischi".

in contrasto, Roberto Browing una volta ha detto "un uomo deve cercare di
arrivare oltre il suo limite". Questa affermazione e' l'antitesi della
Hollywood di oggi. Hanno capito che l'Arte non e' creata dal fare le cose
standard ma al contrario del cercare di andare oltre, ti danno quello che
e' facile, piu' e piu' volte la stessa cosa.
I critici sembrano non cogliere questo e continuano a far parte di questa
frode colossale scrivendo ogni volta le stesse cazzate.

La costante crescita di pura Spazzatura produce ogni anno i suoi risultati
in una enorme spreco di carta e inchiostro. Il mercato moderno della
costante crescita di sale multiplex, infiniti canali tv, negozi TV,
monopolizza efficacemente il limitato spazio dei giornali. Come risultato
film fatti da gente la cui visione va oltre il profitto vengono sommersi
dalla marea di film spazzatura e dalla sua pubblicita'. Questa tacita
cospirazione tra produttori di film e giornali garantisce che film fatti
per il profitto avranno successo e che film fatti per l'arte falliscano.

la prima parte della formula per il successo al botteghino che ho citato
all'inizio e' una filosofia che supera le altre. la cosa piu' importante e'
perseguire la mediocrita'. Il film mediocre non ha bisogno di generare
grossi incassi nelle sale. Puo' volerci un pochino di tempo ma il "product
placement" recupera gran parte dei costi. Dopo le sale in america ci sono i
mercati oltre l'oceano, la TV e i video. l'unico modo di mandare all'aria
questo e' cercare di far film migliori.

La seconda parte della formula standar enfatizza lo stile sopra la sostanza
e include i seguenti dettati:

* Comincia con una idea, non un copione, scrivere non e' importante.

* non dipendere mai dalla visione di uno scrittore solo, ma prendi un
comitato, cosi' uno scrittore puo' vedere gli errori che gli altri stanno
facendo.

* prendi una star, recitare non e' cosi' importante

* prendi un compositore bomba. Il compositore e' piu' importante dello
scrittore. La buona scrittura e' difficile e rara, perche' disturbarsi a
trovarla quando puoi rimestare le emozioni con della musica ad alto volume?
(in certi film destinati ai figli del baby boom il compositore non e'
nemmeno necessario, basta un disc jokey. Seleziona il giusto miscuglio di
album del periodo d'oro anni 80, alla tarantino, e avrai fatto goal.

* prendi effetti speciali, anche qui, l'importante e' il volume, non i
contenuti.

* Soprattutto, punta sul lieto fine. Voila, arriva diritto facilmente e
non ha effetti collaterali quali ricordarsi lo stesso finale in un altro
film quando la stessa cosa viene ricucinata e servita ancora.

Dico che questo sta funzionando da almeno 20anni basandomi su una
conversazione riportata sul NYT qualche anno fa.
Il reporter aveva seguito un produttore indipendente per un po e scritto su
di lui. A un certo punto stava avendo un pranzo con un produttore
mainstream e gli dice: "ti ricordi come erano grandi certi vecchi film
degli anni 70 quando finivano senza happy end? Film come Mean Street e The
parallaz view e MCCABE AND MRS.MILLER?" Il tipo del mainstream lo guarda
come se fosse un idiota e gli fa "oh, quello... quello e' finito con ROCKY"

I produttori lo hanno capito, ma i critici non ci sono ancora arrivati.
Molti critici ora sono solo zoccole della frase. Cercano di inserire una
riga furbetta in ogni recensione che scrivono nella speranza che sara'
usata e accredita a loro sui manifesti della pubblicita'. Finche' riescono
a piazzare una frase nella pubblicita' la loro carriera e' un successo.
Non importa quanto faccia schifo il film, trovera' sempre qualche mezza
dozzina di critici che diranno che e' grande in un modo che possa essere
quotato. Nel New York Times di oggi, Siskel e Ebert (rip) danno "due
pollici su" a sette sole. Danno anche "un buon film da portarci la morosa"
ad altri otto. Di Paul Wunder si riporta che abbia detto che THE LOST WORLD
e' il divertimento della decade. Maria Sales dice che CON AIR e' la corsa
sulle montagne russe del secolo. Joel Siegal dice che SPEED 2 e' il film
dell'estate. Janet Maslin dice che BREAKDOWN "ti ribalta. E via di questo
passo. Sciocche sovrastime, iperboli senza senso, triti cliche', e bugie a
manetta.

Per aiutare la gente a dire di no alla spazzatura di Hollywood offro questi
dieci consigli.

Non andare mai a vedere un film perche' e' "numero uno in america"

Non andare mai a vedere un film che ha usato piu' di due sceneggiatori o e'
basato su un romanzo vendutissimo.

Non andare mai a vedere un film che pubblicizza che la prorpia colonna
sonora e' in vendita. Soprattutto se elenca diversi artisti come "hanno
partecipato alla colonna sonora"

Non andare mai a vedere un film perche' hai visto la pubblicita' in
televisione o perche' il trailer aveva una battuta divertente.
I trailers una volta veniva usati per suggerire cosa avresti visto.
Non volevano regalare nulla, solo farti cacciare i soldi per andarli a
vedere.
Adesso usano la scena piu' divertente o la battuta piu' simpatica per farti
credere che il film e' tutto fatto cosi'.

Non andare mai a vedere un film che mostra collegamenti con una qualunque
catena di hamburger.

Non andare mai a vedere un film dove c'e' una pubblicita' con una pistola
che ti punta contro o che abbia un numero dopo il titolo.

Non andare mai a vedere un film che e' basato su una storia vera e tu ti
aspetti la verita'.

Non andare mai a vedere un film basato su uno spettacolo TV che i figli
degli anni 60 ricordano.

Non andare mai a vedere un film che e' cosi' gramo che non piace nemmeno a
Siskel and Ebert (rip...) e il produttore deve inventarsi qualche troiata
che non hai mai sentito o ricavata da qualche oscura pubblicazione.

Non andare mai a vedere un film con Quentin Tarentino, Oliver Stone, o
chiunque altro hai voglia di aggiungere a questa lista...
--
www.iaciners.org
<<Bridget Jones: You think you've found the right man, but there's so much
wrong with him, and then he finds there's so much wrong with you, and then
it all just falls apart.>>
Nicola de Angeli
2005-03-23 02:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film perche' e' "numero uno in america"
Robots.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film che ha usato piu' di due sceneggiatori o e'
basato su un romanzo vendutissimo.
Il ritorno del Re.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film che pubblicizza che la prorpia colonna
sonora e' in vendita. Soprattutto se elenca diversi artisti come "hanno
partecipato alla colonna sonora"
Ray.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film perche' hai visto la pubblicita' in
televisione o perche' il trailer aveva una battuta divertente.
I trailers una volta veniva usati per suggerire cosa avresti visto.
Non volevano regalare nulla, solo farti cacciare i soldi per andarli a
vedere.
Adesso usano la scena piu' divertente o la battuta piu' simpatica per farti
credere che il film e' tutto fatto cosi'.
Gli Incredibili.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film che mostra collegamenti con una qualunque
catena di hamburger.
Super Size Me.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film dove c'e' una pubblicita' con una pistola
che ti punta contro o che abbia un numero dopo il titolo.
Una 44 Magnum per l'Ispettore Callaghan.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film che e' basato su una storia vera e tu ti
aspetti la verita'.
Schindler's List.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film basato su uno spettacolo TV che i figli
degli anni 60 ricordano.
Thunderbirds (ueila', per una volta ha ragione).
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film che e' cosi' gramo che non piace nemmeno a
Siskel and Ebert (rip...) e il produttore deve inventarsi qualche troiata
che non hai mai sentito o ricavata da qualche oscura pubblicazione.
The Toxic Avenger.
Post by AP
Non andare mai a vedere un film con Quentin Tarentino, Oliver Stone, o
chiunque altro hai voglia di aggiungere a questa lista...
Platoon (Oliver Stone), Le iene.


Ho invitato Dennis a cena, ha detto che viene volentieri.


Ciao
Nicola

skype: deca64

--

"Striving for mediocrity in a world of excellence."

Loading...